Radiocarbon dating fossils

Carbon-14’s half-life is too short to measure dates over a million years ago.In fact, if the entire earth were solid carbon-14, in a million years so much would have decayed that there would not be even a single atom of carbon-14 left.Another question that might come up with respect to these studies is the issue of contamination.If young organic material became mixed with the dinosaur material that was carbon-14 dated, then the younger material would skew the result to a younger age.Several tests were done by the University of Georgia using accelerator mass spectrometry.The age for all these fossils was found to be less than 50,000 years.However, the abstract of the Miller presentation was removed from the website for the conference. Double-click on the box for Wednesday, Room Leo 2, BG02.

Notice the titles of 4 and 6 correspond in both lists, which in the opinion of some, hints strongly that the list with number 5 present was an original list." href="#footnote5_ny0mhb7"Why is the information presented in the paper important?If the accepted ages of millions of years for dinosaurs were to be found to be in error, this would be a problem to evolution.The dinosaur dates reported below and discussed in the AOGS 2012 paper discussed throughout this article, included triceratops, hadrosaur, allosaurus, and acrocanthasaurs.Given the initial amount of carbon-14, the decay rate, and the remaining amount of carbon-14 in a fossil, the length of time it would take for the initial amount of carbon-14 to decay to the amount measured as remaining in the fossil may be calculated.Carbon-14 decays with a half-life of about 5,730 years.

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Scientists have done studies which suggest that dinosaurs lived millions of years ago, but those dates were not arrived at by use of carbon-14 dating methods.

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